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performance calendar
Wednesday, June 28, 2017

Fred P. Hall Amphitheater,
Palatine IL
8:00pm

Monday, July 3, 2017

Wallace Bowl at Gillson Park,
Wilmette IL
7:30pm

Tuesday, July 4, 2017

Lagoon at Dawes Park,
Evanston IL
7:30pm

Sunday, July 23, 2017

Main Beach Bandshell,
Crystal Lake IL
12:30pm

Wednesday, July 26, 2017

Fred P. Hall Amphitheater,
Palatine IL
8:00pm

Sunday, November 12, 2017

Cutting Hall,
Palatine IL
3:30pm

Friday, December 1, 2017

Cutting Hall,
Palatine IL
7:00pm

Sunday, March 11, 2018

Altergott Auditorium at Palatine High School,
Palatine IL
3:30pm

Sunday, April 29, 2018

Cutting Hall,
Palatine IL
3:30pm

program notes > A > Athletic Festival March

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Athletic Festival March

Sergei Prokofieff/arr. Richard Franko Goldman

 

Athletic Festival March Sergei Prokofieff (1891-1953) was a prominent Russian pianist, conductor and composer. He wrote operas, symphonies, ballets, concertos and sonatas. He was born in the Ukraine and graduated from the St. Petersburg Conservatory. He achieved initial notoriety as an iconoclastic composer-pianist with a series of ferociously dissonant and virtuosic works.

Prokofieff left for the west after the Russian Revolution and returned in 1936 to a chilling lack of artistic freedom. He wrote some patriotic music out of necessity but did not succumb completely to Soviet dogma, for which he paid a price.

In this “March for the Spartakiad” Prokofieff imagined a gathering of millions of young Soviet athletes. The march is written in a triumphant, positive vein for the glory of Soviet Russia, but also in the festive tradition of much nineteenth-century Russian music. A basic march theme is interspersed with more tuneful “Russian” melodies. The form is clear cut, using rondo elements and exact reprise, with a minimum of dissonance.

In 1948 the Politburo denounced Prokofieff and others for the crime of "formalism", described as a "renunciation of the basic principles of classical music" in favor of "muddled, nerve-racking" sounds that "turned music into cacophony."

Last updated on May 4, 2015 by Palatine Concert Band